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Diabetes self-evaluation

Updated: Sep 6, 2023



The Canadian Diabetes Risk Questionnaire (CANRISK) can help people evaluate the risk of having pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. This questionnaire is intended primarily for adults aged 40 to 74 years. There is a PDF version of the CANRISK, which is very convenient to use.



You can also use the Online version:



Here is a brief instruction of how to best use this self-evaluation.

  1. Select your age group: There is higher risk of diabetes for older age. Just type your points in the corresponding box for the Score.

  2. Are you male or female: Males have higher risk of diabetes than females. Just type your points in the corresponding box for the Score.

  3. How tall are you and how much do you weigh: This is to calculate your Body Mass Index (BMI), which is a measure of body fat based on height and weight that applies to adult men and women. This is a very important indicator of proper weight. The normal range should be between 18.5 and 24.9. If BMI is less than 18.5, you are underweight; if BMI is greater than 24.9, you are overweight. Either underweight or overweight is not good for your health. In order to locate your BMI, just locate your height at the left side of the table and locate your weight at the bottom of the table, the intersection will indicate your BMI value. Just type your points in the corresponding box for the Score.

  4. Your waist circumference: The scoring of men and women are different. Just type your points in the corresponding box for the Score.

  5. Physical activity: Being active with physical activity helps to reduce the risk of diabetes. Just type your points in the corresponding box for the Score.

  6. How often do you eat vegetables or fruits: Eating healthy foods helps to reduce the risk of diabetes. Just type your points in the corresponding box for the Score.

  7. High blood pressure: The normal range for blood pressure should be between 90 and 120 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) for the top number (systolic) and between 60 and 80 mm Hg for the bottom number (diastolic). If the top number is between 120 and 129 mm Hg while the bottom number is less than 80 mm Hg, you have elevated risk of high blood pressure and should pay more attention to it. If the top number is between 130 and 139 mm Hg or the bottom number is between 80 and 89 mm Hg, it's called high blood pressure (hypertension) stage 1, and medication may be required to control blood pressure. If the top number is 140 mm Hg or higher, or the bottom number is 90 mm Hg or higher, it's called high blood pressure (hypertension) stage 2, which could be very dangerous for your health. Just type your points in the corresponding box for the Score.

  8. High blood sugar: The normal range for blood sugar should be between 80 and 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or 4.4 to 7.2 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) before meals, and should be less than 180 mg/dL (10.0 mmol/L) two hours after meals. Just type your points in the corresponding box for the Score.

  9. Have you ever given birth to a large baby: This is only for women. Just type your points in the corresponding box for the Score.

  10. Have any of your blood relatives ever been diagnosed with diabetes: There may be genetic factors for diabetes. So a family history of diabetes may have some impacts. Add up all the points and type the total points to the red box, and the corresponding box for the Score will be updated automatically.

  11. Ethnic groups: Different ethnic groups have different risks of having diabetes. Just select the ethnic groups for your mother and father, and type the greater points in the corresponding box for the Score.

  12. Highest level of education: This may affect the awareness of diabetes risks. Just type your points in the corresponding box for the Score.


Add up all the points in the corresponding boxes for the Score, and type the sum of the points in the "Total Score" box. This is the final score for evaluating the risk of diabetes. If the score is lower than 21, the risk is low; if the score is between 21 and 32, the risk is moderate, and you should pay more attention and consult with a health care practitioner; if the score is 33 or more, the risk is high, and you should take a blood sugar test as soon as possible.



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©Debo
©Debo
Jul 31, 2022

Insightful post.

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These risk scores are in no way a substitute for actual clinical diagnosis. If you have any concerns, please consider discussing your results with a health care practitioner (eg. family doctor, nurse practitioner, pharmacist).

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